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Updated: 25 min 39 sec ago

Bishop at forefront of initiative says racism demands church's attention

Wed, 08/23/2017 - 5:46pm

IMAGE: CNS photo/Bob Roller

By Rhina Guidos

WASHINGTON (CNS) -- By creating a committee to deal with racism, the country's Catholic bishops are standing up for the American value of equality and for a Gospel that refutes the hatred and violence the country witnessed Aug. 11 and 12 during white supremacist demonstrations in Charlottesville, Virginia, said the bishop who will lead the effort.

"When I watched it, I was just appalled. I couldn't believe that that was going on in the United States and that there was so much disregard for people," said Bishop George V. Murry of Youngstown, Ohio, a Jesuit and the chair of the newly formed Ad Hoc Committee Against Racism, during an Aug. 23 interview with Catholic News Service. "I was happy that the bishops responded so quickly, and that many people across our country responded so quickly to say: 'This is not who we are. This is not America.'"

When something such as Charlottesville occurs, a response is needed, said Bishop Murry. He made the comments shortly after a news conference announcing the formation of the ad hoc group, which is moving quickly to put together a national summit of religious leaders and others to participate in the effort.

"Unfortunately, it's not only Charlottesville," said Bishop Murry. "There have been other instances of discrimination and lack of caring, of outright hate for people who are African-American or other people of color, immigrants, newcomers. What the bishops are saying is we need to look at this in a concerted organized way because this is having a negative effect on the life of our country."

By forming the committee, the bishops have placed racism as a priority they must address and quickly. The last two U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops' ad hoc committees dealt with religious liberty and marriage, established in 2011 and 2008, respectively.

Bishop Murry said that with this particular effort, the bishops are saying: "Whether you're Catholic, Muslim, or Jewish, or Protestant, we are Americans and we have American values and one of those values is equality. And when people are denied their opportunity to be equal and are not treated as equal, we need to speak out and stand together as Americans and call for American values, one of the most important being equality."

During the news conference, Bishop Murry said the church in the U.S. will get the message out through its network of parishes, schools, Catholic charities and all Catholic organizations "that this is an urgent issue that demands our attention and it is a very serious issue because of the fact that racism is contrary to the Gospel of Jesus Christ."

When a reporter from the EWTN network asked during the news conference about Confederate statues being taken down, the reason that the rally and subsequent violence started in Charlottesville, he said: "I am much more interested in the underlying issues. ... What I want to focus on is our responsibility as men and women of faith to respect each other."

That's what the Gospel calls Christians to do: to love and respect one another, he said.

"We're here today because of our confidence that Christ wishes to break down these walls created by the evils of racism, be they on display for the world to see or buried deep within the recesses of our hearts," he said during the news conference. "For too long the sin of racism has lived and thrived in our communities and even in some of our churches."

As a pastor, he has met many who have experienced racism and prejudice, he said, and as an African-American, he, too, walks that path. He recalled an instance when he was a seminarian and someone thought he was the gardener because he is black.

"He didn't think that an African-American could be a seminarian, so he just assumed that I was a gardener. And there have been others instances that have happened over the years," he told CNS.

Faith helps during those moments. The experiences have helped him comfort others, he said.

"There is no way that a person can be disregarded and disrespected and not feel it," he said. "You do feel it. It has a deep ... it's a deep wound but it is faith in Jesus Christ that helps us overcome that."

Faith helps people forgive, he said, or at least deal with the situation better.

"I and others have had experiences where you can't talk it out with someone and you simply have to realize that Jesus died in expiation for our sins," he said. "All of us are sinners and God is willing to forgive us. We need to forgive each other."

The work of the committee will address some of those issues, he said, adding that he is aware that it's not a quick fix, nor will it end racism. But the Catholic Church has spoken against racism for a long time and will continue to be part of efforts to eradicate it, he said.

"I do not have any sort of unrealistic expectations that America is going to become dramatically different in two weeks, but I think that it is the role of the church to be a moral voice and that's what the church is doing right now," he said to CNS. "It is speaking out and saying that all men and women are created in the image and likeness of God."

Bishop Martin D. Holley of Memphis, Tennessee, said he was encouraged by the announcement of the ad hoc committee in light of the recent "appalling" incidents of violence and hatred throughout the country.

"We must end the racism, violence, bigotry and hatred that continue to create division between us," he said in a statement.

Sister Patricia Chappell, a Sister of Notre Dame de Namur, who is executive director of Pax Christi USA, said inserting the word "racism" in the name of the committee is a good and positive step forward and recognizes the problem.

She said she hoped the bishops would involve Catholic groups that have long worked at the grass-roots level with communities of color in addressing the issue, including the National Black Catholic Congress; Latino organizers for the fifth national Encuentro in 2018, for which preparations are well underway; as well as Catholic American Indians and Asian and Pacific Islanders. She said she also wished to see it become a standing committee with the USCCB, which would make it more of a permanent nature since racism will not go away soon.

But she said people need to be willing to engage in painful conversations, including talking about white privilege and the racial oppression people of color.

"If not, we will never be able to move and dismantle institutional racism," she said. "As Catholics, we have to be willing to have the hard conversations and be honest with each other, and through prayer, mutual dialogue, reflection and action, we certainly can build the beloved community."

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Follow Guidos on Twitter: @CNS_Rhina.

 

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Copyright © 2017 Catholic News Service/U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops. www.catholicnews.com. All rights reserved. Republishing or redistributing of CNS content, including by framing or similar means without prior permission, is prohibited. You may link to stories on our public site. This copy is for your personal, non-commercial use only. To request permission for republishing or redistributing of CNS content, please contact permissions at cns@catholicnews.com.

Bishops form new body to address 'sin of racism' that 'afflicts' nation

Wed, 08/23/2017 - 12:11pm

By

WASHINGTON (CNS) -- Saying there is an "urgent need" to address "the sin of racism" in the country and find solutions to it, the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops has established a new Ad Hoc Committee Against Racism and named one of the country's African-American Catholic bishops to chair it.

Cardinal Daniel N. DiNardo of Galveston-Houston, USCCB president, initiated the committee Aug. 23 "to focus on addressing the sin of racism in our society, and even in our church, and the urgent need to come together as a society to find solutions."

He appointed Bishop George V. Murry of Youngstown, Ohio, chairman of the USCCB's Committee on Catholic Education, to chair the new ad hoc committee.

"Recent events have exposed the extent to which the sin of racism continues to afflict our nation," Cardinal DiNardo said in a statement. "The establishment of this new ad hoc committee will be wholly dedicated to engaging the church and our society to work together in unity to challenge the sin of racism, to listen to persons who are suffering under this sin, and to come together in the love of Christ to know one another as brothers and sisters."

The naming of members to serve on the new body will be finalized in coming days, the USCCB said in an announcement. It added that the committee's mandate "will be confirmed at the first meeting, expected very shortly."

"I look forward to working with my brother bishops as well as communities across the United States to listen to the needs of individuals who have suffered under the sin of racism and together find solutions to this epidemic of hate that has plagued our nation for far too long," Bishop Murry said in a statement.

"Through Jesus' example of love and mercy, we are called to be a better people than what we have witnessed over the past weeks and months as a nation. Through listening, prayer and meaningful collaboration, I'm hopeful we can find lasting solutions and common ground where racism will no longer find a place in our hearts or in our society."

The new ad hoc committee also will "welcome and support" implementation of the U.S. bishops' new pastoral letter on racism, expected to be released in 2018. In 1979, the bishops issued a pastoral in racism titled "Brothers and Sisters to Us," in which they addressed many themes, but the overall message then as today was "racism is a sin."

Creation of a new formal body that is part of the USCCB -- formed on the USCCB Executive Committee's "unanimous recommendation" -- speaks to how serious the U.S. Catholic Church leaders take the problem of racism in America today.

It is the first ad hoc committee the bishops have established since instituting the Ad Hoc Committee for Religious Liberty in 2011 to address growing concerns over the erosion of freedom of religion in America. The federal governments mandate that all employers, including religious employers provide health care coverage of artificial contraceptives and abortifacients was one of the key issues that prompted formation of the committee.

Chaired by Baltimore Archbishop William E. Lori, that body was elevated to full USCCB committee status during the bishops' spring assembly in Indianapolis this past June.

In addition to the Executive Committee's recommendation, the USCCB said, the decision to initiate the new Ad Hoc Committee Against Racism also was made in consultation with members of the USCCB's Committee on Priorities and Plans.

The formation of the ad hoc committee also follows the conclusion of the work of the Peace in Our Communities Task Force. The task force was formed in July 2016 by then-Archbishop Joseph E. Kurtz of Louisville, Kentucky, who was then USCCB president. He initiated it in response to racially related shootings in Baton Rouge, Louisiana, as well as in Minneapolis and Dallas.

To head it he named Archbishop Wilton D. Gregory of Atlanta, one of the nation's African-American prelates who was the first black Catholic bishop to be president of the USCCB (2001-2004).

The task force's mandate was to explore ways of promoting peace and healing around the country. Archbishop Kurtz also wanted the bishops to look for ways they could help the suffering communities, as well as police affected by the incidents.

On Nov. 14, 2016, during the USCCB's fall general assembly, Archbishop Gregory told the bishops to issue, sooner rather than later, a document on racism.

"A statement from the full body of bishops on racism is increasingly important at this time," said the archbishop in reporting on the work of the task force.

He said the president of the bishops' conference and relevant committees need to "identify opportunities for a shorter-term statement on these issues, particularly in the context of the postelection uncertainty and disaffection."

He also urged prayer, ecumenical and interfaith collaboration, dialogue, parish-based and diocesan conversations and training, as well as opportunities for encounter.

The bishops' 1979 pastoral, now in its 19th printing, declared: "Racism is a sin: a sin that divides the human family, blots out the image of God among specific members of that family, and violates the fundamental human dignity of those called to be children of the same Father."

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Copyright © 2017 Catholic News Service/U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops. www.catholicnews.com. All rights reserved. Republishing or redistributing of CNS content, including by framing or similar means without prior permission, is prohibited. You may link to stories on our public site. This copy is for your personal, non-commercial use only. To request permission for republishing or redistributing of CNS content, please contact permissions at cns@catholicnews.com.

Bishops form new body to address 'sin of racism' that 'inflicts' nation

Wed, 08/23/2017 - 10:05am

By

WASHINGTON (CNS) -- Saying there is an "urgent need" to address "the sin of racism" in the country and find solutions to it, the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops has established a new Ad Hoc Committee Against Racism and named one of the country's African-American Catholic bishops to chair it.

Cardinal Daniel N. DiNardo of Galveston-Houston, USCCB president, initiated the committee Aug. 23 "to focus on addressing the sin of racism in our society, and even in our church, and the urgent need to come together as a society to find solutions."

He appointed Bishop George V. Murry of Youngstown, Ohio, chairman of the USCCB's Committee on Catholic Education, to chair the new ad hoc committee.

"Recent events have exposed the extent to which the sin of racism continues to inflict our nation," Cardinal DiNardo said in a statement. "The establishment of this new ad hoc committee will be wholly dedicated to engaging the church and our society to work together in unity to challenge the sin of racism, to listen to persons who are suffering under this sin, and to come together in the love of Christ to know one another as brothers and sisters."

The naming of members to serve on the new body will be finalized in coming days, the USCCB said in an announcement. It added that the committee's mandate "will be confirmed at the first meeting, expected very shortly."

"I look forward to working with my brother bishops as well as communities across the United States to listen to the needs of individuals who have suffered under the sin of racism and together find solutions to this epidemic of hate that has plagued our nation for far too long," Bishop Murry said in a statement.

"Through Jesus' example of love and mercy, we are called to be a better people than what we have witnessed over the past weeks and months as a nation. Through listening, prayer and meaningful collaboration, I'm hopeful we can find lasting solutions and common ground where racism will no longer find a place in our hearts or in our society."

The new ad hoc committee also will "welcome and support" implementation of the U.S. bishops' new pastoral letter on racism, expected to be released in 2018. In 1979, the bishops issued a pastoral in racism titled "Brothers and Sisters to Us," in which they addressed many themes, but the overall message then as today was "racism is a sin."

Creation of a new formal body that is part of the USCCB -- formed on the USCCB Executive Committee's "unanimous recommendation" -- speaks to how serious the U.S. Catholic Church leaders take the problem of racism in America today.

It is the first ad hoc committee the bishops have established since instituting the Ad Hoc Committee for Religious Liberty in 2011 to address growing concerns over the erosion of freedom of religion in America. The federal governments mandate that all employers, including religious employers provide health care coverage of artificial contraceptives and abortifacients was one of the key issues that prompted formation of the committee.

Chaired by Baltimore Archbishop William E. Lori, that body was elevated to full USCCB committee status during the bishops' spring assembly in Indianapolis this past June.

In addition to the Executive Committee's recommendation, the USCCB said, the decision to initiate the new Ad Hoc Committee Against Racism also was made in consultation with members of the USCCB's Committee on Priorities and Plans.

The formation of the ad hoc committee also follows the conclusion of the work of the Peace in Our Communities Task Force. The task force was formed in July 2016 by then-Archbishop Joseph E. Kurtz of Louisville, Kentucky, who was then USCCB president. He initiated it in response to racially related shootings in Baton Rouge, Louisiana, as well as in Minneapolis and Dallas.

To head it he named Archbishop Wilton D. Gregory of Atlanta, one of the nation's African-American prelates who was the first black Catholic bishop to be president of the USCCB (2001-2004).

The task force's mandate was to explore ways of promoting peace and healing around the country. Archbishop Kurtz also wanted the bishops to look for ways they could help the suffering communities, as well as police affected by the incidents.

On Nov. 14, 2016, during the USCCB's fall general assembly, Archbishop Gregory told the bishops to issue, sooner rather than later, a document on racism.

"A statement from the full body of bishops on racism is increasingly important at this time," said the archbishop in reporting on the work of the task force.

He said the president of the bishops' conference and relevant committees need to "identify opportunities for a shorter-term statement on these issues, particularly in the context of the postelection uncertainty and disaffection."

He also urged prayer, ecumenical and interfaith collaboration, dialogue, parish-based and diocesan conversations and training, as well as opportunities for encounter.

The bishops' 1979 pastoral, now in its 19th printing, declared: "Racism is a sin: a sin that divides the human family, blots out the image of God among specific members of that family, and violates the fundamental human dignity of those called to be children of the same Father."

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Copyright © 2017 Catholic News Service/U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops. www.catholicnews.com. All rights reserved. Republishing or redistributing of CNS content, including by framing or similar means without prior permission, is prohibited. You may link to stories on our public site. This copy is for your personal, non-commercial use only. To request permission for republishing or redistributing of CNS content, please contact permissions at cns@catholicnews.com.

Pope: God gives hope for the future despite present-day suffering

Wed, 08/23/2017 - 10:03am

By Junno Arocho Esteves

VATICAN CITY (CNS) -- While the world reels from terrorism, natural disasters and division, God weeps with those who suffer and offers the hope of a future full of joy and consolation, Pope Francis said.

Recalling the victims of a terror attack in Barcelona Aug. 17, a devastating landslide Aug. 16 in Congo, and "many other" tragic global events, the pope urged Christians to meditate on God's tenderness when "they report sad news, which we are all at risk of becoming accustomed to."

"Think of the faces of children frightened by war, the cry of mothers, the broken dreams of many young people, the refugees who face terrible journeys and are exploited so many times," the pope said Aug. 23 during his weekly general audience.

Continuing his series of audience talks on Christian hope, Pope Francis said that in moments of suffering, Christians can find comfort in knowing they have a heavenly father, who "weeps tears of infinite pity for his children" and "has prepared for us a different future."

Reflecting on a reading from the Book of Revelation in which God proclaims that he "makes all things new," the pope explained that Christian hope is based on "faith that God always creates new things" in history, in the cosmos and in everyday life.

Christians must not look downward "like pigs" as if "we were forced into an eternal wandering without any reason for our many labors," he said. Rather, they must trust in God's promise of a "heavenly Jerusalem," a place "where there is no more death nor mourning nor weeping or pain."

God did not create human beings "by mistake, sentencing himself and us to hard nights of anguish," the pope said. "He created us because he wants us to be happy. He is our father and, if right now we are experiencing a life that isn't what he wanted for us, Jesus assures us that God himself is working on our salvation. He works to save us."

Christians, he added, are called to be "people of spring rather than fall" and must always hold on to the hope that "our most beautiful days are yet to come."

"Don't forget to ask yourselves this question: Am I a person of the spring or the fall?" the pope told the pilgrims. "Am I of the spring, which awaits the flowers, awaits the fruit, awaits the sun that is Jesus? Or fall, which always has a face cast down, bitter and, as I have said at times, a sourpuss?"

Like the wheat that grows even when surrounded by darnels, the kingdom of God continues to grow even amid "problems, gossip, war, and sickness," Pope Francis said.

"Creation did not end on the sixth day of Genesis, but continued tirelessly because God always worries about us," he said. "Yes, our father is a God of newness and surprises. And on that day, we will be truly happy and we will weep, but we will be weeping with joy."

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Follow Arocho on Twitter: @arochoju.

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Copyright © 2017 Catholic News Service/U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops. www.catholicnews.com. All rights reserved. Republishing or redistributing of CNS content, including by framing or similar means without prior permission, is prohibited. You may link to stories on our public site. This copy is for your personal, non-commercial use only. To request permission for republishing or redistributing of CNS content, please contact permissions at cns@catholicnews.com.

Venerable church a natural place to view heavens during solar eclipse

Tue, 08/22/2017 - 12:58pm

IMAGE: CNS photo/Ed Langlois, Catholic Sentinel

By Ed Langlois

ST. PAUL, Ore. (CNS) -- Hundreds of solar eclipse viewers Aug. 21 watched the sky grow dim and then witnessed the spectacular dancing white corona of the sun's edge from alongside Oregon's oldest Catholic church.

Built in 1846, St. Paul Church in the small town of St. Paul was already venerable the last time it was in an eclipse path of totality in 1918. The brick building, restored after a 1993 earthquake, stood silent and strong Aug. 21 as the crowd around it cheered and cried out during the eerie minute that the moon blotted out the sun's light.

"God puts on the best shows!" one woman called out.

While the heavens were creating awe, Msgr. Gregory Moys was providing for creature comforts of visitors. Some towns in the eclipse zone provided portable bathrooms, but that was a bit much for the city of St. Paul to afford. Msgr. Moys, pastor of St. Paul Parish, opened up the back door of the 171-year house of worship so viewers could find relief in a set of rooms once used by Oregon's pioneer priests.

One Vancouver, Washington, family made the trip and sat happily in front of St. Paul Church.

"It's a memory they'll have for a long time," James Longfellow said of his wife and children. Longfellow's 8-year-old daughter, Analise, feared she might forget. Her parents assured her she'd remember.

Pete Hamlin, a member of St. Matthew Church in Hillsboro, recalled trying to watch a 1979 eclipse as a child, but the Oregon skies were cloudy.

"This is a good opportunity," Hamlin told the Catholic Sentinel, newspaper of the Archdiocese of Portland. He came to St. Paul with friends Greg Clemmons and John Hedlund.

While the solar event was stunning, the trio spent much of their time before looking over the old brick church and discovering its history.

The edifice replaced a log church that had been built in 1836 by settlers who had written Catholic officials in the East repeatedly before two missionaries were sent from Quebec -- Fathers Francis Blanchet and Modeste Demers. Native American workers helped make the bricks that are still in good shape.

On April 25, 1846, a month before the cornerstone was laid, a partial solar eclipse was visible in St. Paul.

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Langlois is managing editor of the Catholic Sentinel, newspaper of the Archdiocese of Portland.

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Copyright © 2017 Catholic News Service/U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops. www.catholicnews.com. All rights reserved. Republishing or redistributing of CNS content, including by framing or similar means without prior permission, is prohibited. You may link to stories on our public site. This copy is for your personal, non-commercial use only. To request permission for republishing or redistributing of CNS content, please contact permissions at cns@catholicnews.com.

Polish archbishop thinks Vatican will recognize Medjugorje apparitions

Tue, 08/22/2017 - 12:22pm

By Jonathan Luxmoore

WARSAW, Poland (CNS) -- A Polish archbishop who inspected Bosnia-Herzegovina's Medjugorje shrine for the pope predicted the Vatican will soon recognize its Marian apparitions.

"The Congregation for the Doctrine of the Faith has passed all documentation to the Secretariat of State -- everything suggests the apparitions will be accepted before the year ends," said Archbishop Henryk Hoser.

"It's difficult to believe the six visionaries have been lying for 36 years," the archbishop said. "What they say is coherent, and none is mentally disturbed, while the apparitions' faithfulness to church doctrine is also a powerful argument for their authenticity."

The archbishop spoke as he completed a report from his spring mission to the hilltop shrine, which has not been officially recognized by the church despite 2.5 million pilgrims annually.

He told Poland's Catholic Information Agency, KAI, he had found an "exceptional atmosphere" of "spiritual creativeness" at Medjugorje, characterized by "prayer, silence, meditation, Eucharist, adoration, fasting and reconciliation."

He added that the shrine was seeing "huge dynamic growth," in contrast to older sanctuaries in Portugal, France and Poland and had succeeded in remaining "a true place for pilgrims" while "eliminating tourist elements."

"Everything is moving in a good direction. My mission wasn't aimed at closing Medjugorje down, but at evaluating whether pastoral work is being properly organized there in line with church teaching," Archbishop Hoser said.

"My conclusions are that it is, and my impression is highly positive," he told KAI.

Six teenagers claim to have seen the Virgin Mary June 24, 1981, near Medjugorje. Since then, they have reported more than 42,000 apparitions at the site, which was largely untouched by the 1992-95 war in Bosnia-Herzegovina.

In April, the then-prefect of the Congregation for Doctrine of the Faith, Cardinal Gerhard Muller, told KAI ageny it still could "take a long time" for the Vatican to rule on the apparitions, despite Archbishop Hoser's pastoral visitation.

Bishop Ratko Peric of Mostar-Duvno, the local ordinary, has consistently dismissed the Medjugorje apparitions as false, like his predecessor, Bishop Pavao Zanic, and appealed to bishops abroad not to support pilgrimages there.

However, in March, Cardinal Vinko Puljic of Sarajevo, Bosnia-Herzegovina, defended the shrine as "Europe's largest confessional," and said he counted on the Vatican to appreciate its evangelical potential in generating "conversions and acts of grace."

Pope Francis told reporters traveling with him from Fatima, Portugal, in May that the most important fact about Medjugorje is "the spiritual fact, the pastoral fact" that thousands of pilgrims go to Medjugorje and are converted. "For this there is no magic wand; this spiritual-pastoral fact cannot be denied."

The spiritual fruits of the pilgrimages, he said, are the reason why in February he appointed Archbishop Hoser to study the best ways to provide pastoral care to townspeople and the pilgrims.

Speaking to reporters May 13, Pope Francis gave no indication of when a final pronouncement about the alleged apparitions would be made. However, the said that a commission set up by then-Pope Benedict XVI had spent years investigating the phenomenon and tended to believe the apparitions in that first week of the summer of 1981 may have been real, but the continued reports of apparitions are questionable.

Furthermore, Pope Francis told the press, "personally, I am more 'mischievous.' I prefer Our Lady to be a mother, our mother, and not a telegraph operator who sends out a message every day at a certain time -- this is not the mother of Jesus."


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Copyright © 2017 Catholic News Service/U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops. www.catholicnews.com. All rights reserved. Republishing or redistributing of CNS content, including by framing or similar means without prior permission, is prohibited. You may link to stories on our public site. This copy is for your personal, non-commercial use only. To request permission for republishing or redistributing of CNS content, please contact permissions at cns@catholicnews.com.

Two die in earthquake on Italian island

Tue, 08/22/2017 - 12:15pm

By

ROME (CNS) -- One of the two women who died when an earthquake struck the Italian island of Ischia was killed by falling debris from a 19th-century church. The other died in her home, which was destroyed by the quake Aug. 21.

The U.S. Geological Survey said the quake, which struck at 8:57 p.m. local time, measured a magnitude of 4.3. Ischia is located off the coast of Naples.

As of late Aug. 22, Italian authorities had not released the names of the two women who died. The Italian bishops' television station, TV2000, said the destroyed church was Santa Maria dei Suffragio, more commonly known as the "Purgatory Church." The church in the village of Casamicciola was built in the 19th century after a quake in 1883 destroyed the previous church on the site.

Much of the international news coverage of the quake focused on the rescue of three children, brothers, who were buried under the rubble. The first of the brothers to be rescued, seven hours after the quake, was 7-month-old Pasquale. The next morning, rescuers were able to free 7-year-old Mattias. Ciro, 11, was freed 16 hours after the quake. All of the brothers are expected to make a full recovery.

The local hospital originally treated 39 other people for quake-related injuries. One person remained in serious condition, although most of the others were treated and released.

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Copyright © 2017 Catholic News Service/U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops. www.catholicnews.com. All rights reserved. Republishing or redistributing of CNS content, including by framing or similar means without prior permission, is prohibited. You may link to stories on our public site. This copy is for your personal, non-commercial use only. To request permission for republishing or redistributing of CNS content, please contact permissions at cns@catholicnews.com.

Cardinal Parolin visits Russia, focuses on ecumenism and peace

Tue, 08/22/2017 - 11:05am

By Cindy Wooden

VATICAN CITY (CNS) -- Although he said planning a papal trip to Russia was not on the agenda, the Vatican secretary of state said his visit to Moscow was designed to build on the meeting Pope Francis and Russian Orthodox Patriarch Kirill had in Cuba in 2016.

Cardinal Pietro Parolin, the secretary of state, was visiting Moscow Aug. 21-24 and was scheduled to meet with the patriarch and Russian President Vladimir Putin, as well as with leaders of Russia's Catholic community.

The list of topics for the meetings ranged from ecumenical dialogue and interreligious cooperation to current world affairs and climate change, he said in a series of interviews before leaving Rome.

After a long morning meeting Aug. 22, the cardinal and Russian Foreign Minister Sergey Lavrov held a brief news conference, telling reporters they had discussed ongoing conflicts in Ukraine, Syria, Yemen, the Holy Land and Venezuela.

Cardinal Parolin said his meetings with government officials were designed to share "Pope Francis' interest in bilateral relations between the Holy See and the Russian Federation as well as his concerns in the sphere of international affairs."

"Obviously," the cardinal said, "the meeting offered an occasion to discuss some concrete questions regarding the life of the Catholic Church in the Russian Federation, including the difficulties that remain in obtaining work permits for non-Russian religious personnel and the restitution of some churches, which are needed for the pastoral care of Catholics in the country." Many church buildings were confiscated by the former Soviet government and never returned.

Regarding international affairs, Cardinal Parolin said he and Lavrov discussed several ongoing conflicts, including the war in Eastern Ukraine and the war in Syria.

In situations of war, he said, the Catholic Church often is directly involved in promoting humanitarian aid for the victims, but it also works on a diplomatic level to promote a negotiated peace with guarantees of "justice, legality, truth" and the safety of civilians.

The Russian foreign ministry posted online the first minutes of the working meeting between Cardinal Parolin and Lavrov.

The foreign minister told the cardinal, "We see that our positions are close on a number of current issues, including the peaceful settlement of crises, fighting terrorism and extremism, promoting the dialogue among religions and civilizations and strengthening social justice and the role of the family."

And, he said, it is important that the strengthening of Vatican-Russian relations is "complemented by the dialogue between religions, which was launched during the historical meeting between Patriarch Kirill and Pope Francis in Cuba."

Cardinal Parolin began his visit to Russia with a meeting with Metropolitan Hilarion of Volokolamsk, head of external relations for the Russian Orthodox Church.

After the meeting, he told reporters their time together was very constructive, and that even though there are "thorny issues," there also is a great desire to overcome them. As an example of an ongoing difficulty, Cardinal Parolin said the existence of the Ukrainian Catholic Church "remains for the Russian Orthodox Church an obstacle."

In the evening Aug. 21, Cardinal Parolin presided over a Mass for Moscow's Catholics in the Cathedral of the Immaculate Conception. Before Mass, he had met with the country's Catholic bishops.

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Copyright © 2017 Catholic News Service/U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops. www.catholicnews.com. All rights reserved. Republishing or redistributing of CNS content, including by framing or similar means without prior permission, is prohibited. You may link to stories on our public site. This copy is for your personal, non-commercial use only. To request permission for republishing or redistributing of CNS content, please contact permissions at cns@catholicnews.com.

Eclipse thrills, inspires viewers to admire the precision of creation

Mon, 08/21/2017 - 5:47pm

IMAGE: CNS photo/Dennis Sadowski

By Dennis Sadowski

HOPKINSVILLE, Ky. (CNS) -- Science teacher Jane Irwin isn't often left without words, but the total solar eclipse left her in a quiet reflective mood.

"Awesome. God's amazing" was the best she could muster after the sun reappeared from behind the moon after totality Aug. 21.

"I've got to synthesize this myself," she said minutes after the sun reappeared as the moon moved away from obscuring Earth's closest stellar neighbor. "How can people deny the existence of God after seeing this? I'm not a terribly emotional person, but I got choked up seeing it."

Irwin was among about 50 people gathered at Sts. Peter and Paul Parish in Hopkinsville, the town near the point of maximum eclipse. She planned to have her students write about the eclipse when classes resumed Aug. 23. Her inspiration for the assignment was Jesuit Brother Guy Consolmagno, director of the Vatican Observatory, who spoke at the parish Aug. 20 during a pre-eclipse program.

"Brother Guy said if you didn't write about it, it didn't happened. Hopefully, in 10 years when they pull that out, they'll remember and be inspired by what they saw," Irwin said.

Joining her was one of her students, Tim Sunderhaus, 8, a third-grader at the parish school.

Tim was accompanied by brothers Luke, 12, in seventh grade, and Peter, 10, in fifth grade, and father Todd. Luke called the eclipse an amazing sight.

He found the sun's corona -- the intensely hot outer atmosphere visible from Earth only during a total eclipse -- most interesting to observe. "I was thinking it finally happened because people have been talking about it for such a long time," he told Catholic News Service.

Cheers and whistles erupted in the parish parking lot where viewers had gathered as darkness approached and the corona appeared around a black hole. Three bright red prominences appeared along the right edge of the sun during totality.

People called out the planets as they appeared. First there was bright Venus to the west of the sun and then Mercury very close to eastern limb of the star. Crickets began chirping, thinking night was approaching. The air cooled several degrees as the moon's shadow deepened.

The entire event was impressive for Franciscan Father Richard Goodin, vocation director for his order's St. John the Baptist Province based in Cincinnati. The Kentucky native drove from Cincinnati overnight to see the eclipse after a redeye flight from Las Vegas where he preached at Masses Aug. 19 and 20 making a mission appeal.

"This is a once in a lifetime opportunity. I like to brag I'm all things Kentucky," he told CNS as a blue University of Kentucky cap shielded his bearded face from the hot sun. "What better and more fitting place for this to be than in Kentucky?"

Hopkinsville officials and business owners had worked for nearly two years to capitalize on the eclipse. They billed their town as "Eclipseville." Located near the point of maximum eclipse, the city of 33,000 wanted to showcase its friendliness and the quality of life it offers in largely agricultural Christian County.

Eclipse chasers started arriving Aug. 18 and by the morning of the event traffic crawled along city streets.

Some of those travelers made their way to a field the parish owns across the street from the church. Spots were going for $10. Some stayed overnight, camping in tents or in the back of their vehicle. Others, arrived in the pre-dawn hours eager to catch the spectacle.

Ron Howell and Cheri Ricketts, members of St. Catherine of Siena Church in Toledo, Ohio, were sitting in chairs next to their Chevrolet Equinox enjoying coffee in the warm early morning sun. They said they wanted to see something they had never seen before and that Hopkinsville was a reasonable distance to travel.

"We're basic, but we're prepared," said Howell, 72.

"I'm sure it's going to be spiritually moving, just to see the wonder of it all and the precision," Ricketts, 66, added.

Across the lot Hendrik Schultz, professor of nuclear astrophysics at Michigan State University, sat with his daughter, Lilley, 16, enjoying a slight breeze in the shade of tall trees. He said he brought his daughter and her boyfriend along so they could see something rare and beautiful.

But he was leaving the physics of the eclipse out of any discussion as he showed off the pinhole tube he made to observe the event.

"I don't want to spoil it with too much science. It's like a waterfall. You wouldn't want a lecture on hydrology. You just want to enjoy it," he said.

In another corner, Jayden Braga, 5, patiently waited for the eclipse as his parents, Derrick and Alissa Braga of Rochester Hills, Michigan, tended to housekeeping chores in their tent. The family traveled all night to arrive in time for the celestial wonder.

The youngster explained how important it was to view the eclipse with special glasses until the moment of totality. Then he became more animated.

"I'm so excited," he said, "I could fly off the chair."

In his presentation the evening before, Brother Consolmagno urged people to let the eclipse be an example of God's design for the universe and to appreciate the beauty of ongoing creation.

"This is more than just an emotional sense," Brother Consolmagno told the audience. "It's a sense that speaks to your soul. It's a sense I get when I'm doing science ... the sense I feel in these rare unforgettable moments of prayer and God finds the time to find me to speak."

The presentation before a full house in the church was one of several special events leading to the eclipse. The city also planned a downtown festival over the weekend before the skies darkened. Vendors hawked T-shirts, Christmas tree ornaments, plaques, jewelry, posters and anything else they could creatively tie to the event.

Sts. Peter and Paul parishioner Maureen Leamy took time Aug. 19 to visit the vendors during the downtown festival. An assistant county attorney for Christian County, Leamy was looking forward to seeing the eclipse, even though it meant that Tuesday will be a busy day for hearing criminal cases from the long weekend the court was closed.

"This is time for Hopkinsville to shine," she said. "We never had an event like this."

Andra V. Gold, owner of Accessories Plus in Hopkinsville, made several dozen T-shirts with a snappy message: "Keep calm. It's only the eclipse." He said he sold a few shirts, but more importantly the eclipse and the celebration surrounding it was a way to meet people, some of whom traveled hundreds of miles to southwest Kentucky, and impart a few words of wisdom.

"If they can travel that distance, why can't we walk out our back door and be hospitable?" he said. "We can be hospitable and understand each other."

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Follow Sadowski on Twitter: @DennisSadowski.

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Eclipse a way to appreciate creation, Vatican astronomer tells audience

Mon, 08/21/2017 - 12:11pm

IMAGE: CNS photo/Dennis Sadowski

By Dennis Sadowski

HOPKINSVILLE, Ky. (CNS) -- A total solar eclipse is a rare event, something to appreciate and enjoy in the mind of Jesuit Brother Guy Consolmagno, director of the Vatican Observatory.

So as the first eclipse crossed the country from coast to coast in 99 years Aug. 21, Brother Consolmagno wasn't going to do anything but take it in and think about the beauty and mystery of God's creation.

The astronomer urged an audience in a packed Sts. Peter and Paul Church during a pre-eclipse program in this southwestern Kentucky town near the point of maximum eclipse to take the time to reflect on what the two minutes and 40 seconds of totality means to them.

"Pray for good weather," he said to laughs. "But also pray for what God wants you to learn from the experience."

Tens of thousands of people had descended on Hopkinsville, a city of 33,000 an hour northwest of Nashville, Tennessee, by late Aug. 20. Thousands more were expected the morning of the eclipse. Brother Consolmagno said he was as excited as anyone to view the blackening of the sun.

He also said that as a scientist and a person of faith, he is guided by inquisitiveness to explore the heavens and the desire to better understand how God put the universe together. There is no conflict between science the faith, he said.

"Being a scientist can be a way of worshipping God," he said.

He repeated a similar message to reporters during a news conference before his presentation.

"We're here not just to remind my fellow scientists who are used to me by now, but also to show religious people how important is it to be able to praise the Creator by studying creation, studying it honestly, finding out how God really created this place. There's never going to be a shortage of marvels for us to discover or surprises for us to experience," he said.

"We can come to know the Creator by seeing the things of his creation."

He said the by understanding the cycle of solar eclipses -- occurring about every 18 months and 11 days -- people can see the rhythms of the universe and the continuing nature of creation and have an experience "that fills the soul with joy."

Brother Consolmagno made the trip to Hopkinsville at the invitation of Father Richard Meredith, pastor of Sts. Peter and Paul Church. Father Meredith told Catholic News Service he contacted the Vatican Observatory soon after he learned a few years ago that the eclipse path would pass over the town.

Parishioners prepared for more than a year, having established a committee to welcome visitors and host Brother Consolmagno.

"Being a parish with a parochial school, we stress the unity of truth," Father Meredith said. "This (eclipse) is a major opportunity to reflect that, as science and faith work together serving to manifest the Lord.

The eclipse is a wonder and these wonders praise the creator. This could very well be the only planet around the only star whose moon is at the right distance and size to give a total solar eclipse," the priest said.

He introduced Brother Consolmagno with by reading from Psalm 19: "The heavens proclaim the glory of God; the sky proclaims its builder's craft."

"This isn't only Catholic," he told CNS. "This is a tradition inherited from God's revelation in the Old Testament."

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Follow Sadowski on Twitter:@DennisSadowski.

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Pope leads prayers for an end to 'inhuman violence' of terrorism

Mon, 08/21/2017 - 10:17am

By Cindy Wooden

VATICAN CITY (CNS) -- "Let us beg the Lord, God of mercy and peace, to free the world from this inhuman violence," Pope Francis prayed after a week of deadly terrorist attacks in Africa and Europe.

Reciting the Angelus prayer at midday, the pope asked an estimated 10,000 people in St. Peter's Square to pray in silence and then to join him in reciting the Hail Mary for the victims of the attacks the previous week in Burkina Faso, Spain and Finland.

At a restaurant in Ouagadougou Aug. 13, gunmen opened fire on people eating outside. Authorities in Burkina Faso said 18 people died and 20 were injured. The gunmen were believed to be part of a group known as "al-Qaida in the Islamic Maghreb."

In Spain, 13 people died after a van mowed down pedestrians Aug. 17 on Barcelona's famous Las Ramblas street and another woman died in a vehicle attack the next day in Cambrils. Five suspects were killed by police and other members of what authorities described as a 12-man terrorist cell were being sought.

In Turku, Finland, Aug. 18, two women were stabbed to death and eight other people were injured in what police described as a terrorist attack.

Among the pilgrims in St. Peter's Square for the midday prayer were the 50 first-year students of the Pontifical North American College, the seminary in Rome sponsored by the U.S. bishops. Pope Francis gave them a shoutout before wishing everyone in the square a happy Sunday.

In his main Angelus talk, the pope spoke about the day's Gospel reading from St. Matthew about the Canaanite woman who persistently asks Jesus to heal her daughter.

"This woman's interior strength, which allows her to overcome every obstacle, can be found in her maternal love and in her trust that Jesus can fulfill her request," the pope said. "This makes me think of the strength of women. With their strength they are able to obtain great things. We've know many women like this."

In the Gospel story, when the woman first cries out, Jesus seems to ignore her, the pope noted. But she is not discouraged and continues to call out to him.

In the end, Jesus recognizes her great faith and answers her request, the pope said. "Her insistence in invoking Christ's intervention stimulates us never to be discouraged and not to despair when we are oppressed by the harsh trials of life."

"The Lord does not turn away from our needs and, if sometimes he seems indifferent to our requests for help, it is to test us and strengthen our faith," Pope Francis said. "We must continue to cry, like this woman: 'Lord, help me. Lord, help me.'"

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Pope urges respect for the life and dignity of migrants, refugees

Mon, 08/21/2017 - 7:00am

By Cindy Wooden

VATICAN CITY (CNS) -- With millions of people fleeing violence, persecution and poverty around the globe, individual nations must expand options that make it possible for migrants and refugees to cross their borders safely and legally, Pope Francis said.

"The principle of the centrality of the human person, firmly stated by my beloved predecessor, Benedict XVI, obliges us to always prioritize personal safety over national security," Pope Francis wrote in his message for the World Day of Migrants and Refugees 2018.

The Vatican will mark the day Jan. 14, while in the United States, the bishops' conference sets aside an entire week -- Jan. 7-13 -- as National Migration Week.

The pope's message for the annual event was released Aug. 21, which is earlier than normal, to stimulate Catholic involvement in the U.N. process for developing and adopting a Global Compact for Migration and a Global Compact on Refugees.

Since the U.N. General Assembly voted in September 2016 to draw up the compacts, the Vatican and many Catholic organizations have been participating in the discussions and hearings to formulate them. The U.N. hopes to have a draft of the compacts ready by February and to present them to the General Assembly in September 2018.

Approving the development of the compacts, "world leaders clearly expressed their desire to take decisive action in support of migrants and refugees to save their lives and protect their rights," the pope said in his message. He urged Catholics to get involved by lobbying their governments to include in the compacts proposals that would ensure the welcome, protection, promotion and integration of migrants and refugees.

For Catholics, he said, "every stranger who knocks at our door is an opportunity for an encounter with Jesus Christ, who identifies with the welcomed and rejected strangers of every age."

"The Lord entrusts to the church's motherly love every person forced to leave their homeland in search of a better future," Pope Francis wrote.

To fulfill its duties toward migrants and refugees, he said, the church needs all of its members to act in solidarity with them, whether it is in countries of departure, transit, arrival or return.

In the message, Pope Francis called for countries to: "increase and simplify the process for granting humanitarian visas and for reunifying families"; grant special temporary visas to people fleeing conflict; uphold the rights and dignity of migrants and refugees "independent of their legal status"; educate people in migrant-sending countries about their rights and obligations abroad; stop the detention of underage migrants; provide migrants, refugees and asylum seekers with work permits so they can begin supporting themselves and contributing to their new communities; and guarantee the right of all migrants and refugees to practice their faith.

"Considering the current situation, welcoming means, above all, offering broader options for migrants and refugees to enter destination countries safely and legally," the pope said.

And, he said, even when faced with situations in which someone has entered a country without the proper legal permits, "collective and arbitrary expulsions of migrants and refugees are not suitable solutions, particularly where people are returned to countries which cannot guarantee respect for human dignity and fundamental rights."

Nations and local communities, the pope said, need to do more to integrate migrants and refugees in the communities that welcome them. Integration does not mean the newcomers will be asked to give up their cultural identity, but that they will have opportunities to share their cultures and to discover the cultural heritage of their new communities.

Pope Francis signed the message Aug. 15, the feast of the Assumption, and entrusted to Mary "the hopes of all the world's migrants and refugees and the aspirations of the communities which welcome them, so that, responding to the Lord's supreme commandment, we may all learn to love the other, the stranger, as ourselves."

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Vatican pharmacy does booming business

Fri, 08/18/2017 - 3:10pm

By Cindy Wooden

VATICAN CITY (CNS) -- Serving an average of more than 2,000 clients a day, the Vatican pharmacy may be one of the world's busiest in-person dispensaries of pharmaceuticals, over-the-counter medicines, soaps, ointments and elixirs.

Run, since 1874, by the Hospitaller Brothers of St. John of God, the pharmacy continues to produce some of its own ointments and potions, Brother Thomas Binish Mulackal told the Vatican newspaper.

The Vatican's own products include a cream for preventing bedsores, anise and quinine elixirs, six different fragrances of soap, lavender water, an anti-acne lotion and a specially produced aftershave, said Brother Mulackal, the pharmacy director.

The laboratory where the products are made -- and where pharmacists mix some drugs to meet physicians' exact prescriptions for their patients -- is about to undergo an expansion, he said.

In an interview published Aug. 18 in L'Osservatore Romano, the Vatican newspaper, Brother Mulackal said the number of clients served each day averages between 2,000 and 2,500. About half of them are Vatican residents, employees and their family members. The rest come from outside the Vatican for medicines that are not available in Italy or are difficult to find. Outsiders must have a prescription and valid ID to enter.

The pharmacy, which includes a large personal hygiene, beauty and cosmetics section, stocks some 42,000 products, the brother said. The products come from Italy, Switzerland, France, Germany and the United States.

The top-selling products from abroad, he said, are: Bengay, a pain-relieving heat rub; Contractubex, a scar treatment ointment; Hamolind, a hemorrhoid treatment; Pantogar, sold to prevent hair loss; Osteo Bi-Flex for joint health; and Aspir-Low, a low-dosage aspirin.

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Catholic leaders urge prayers, unity after attacks in Spain

Fri, 08/18/2017 - 12:02pm

By Jonathan Luxmoore

OXFORD, England (CNS) -- Spanish church leaders urged prayers and national unity after two terrorist attacks left at least 19 people dead.

Pope Francis, U.S. bishops and others weighed in with prayers and rejection of the Aug. 17 attacks in Barcelona and Cambrils, where cars drove into pedestrians. The Islamic State group claimed credit for the attacks. Thirteen were killed in Barcelona; one pedestrian and five suspects were killed in Cambrils.

"People are deeply shocked and saddened by this totally random event," said Msgr. Josep Ramon Perez, dean of Barcelona's Catholic cathedral. "While many are naturally asking what's happening to the world to make such things possible, many also recognize that the most important response is to pray for peace."

Thousands attended a midday vigil Aug. 18 in Barcelona's Plaza de Catalunya, attended by Spanish King Felipe VI and government and political party leaders from across the country. Spanish police asked mourners not to bring bags or backpacks to the vigil, which was accompanied by parallel commemorations in Madrid and other cities, as well as at the European Union's headquarters in Brussels.

Barcelona Cardinal Juan Jose Omella interrupted his retreat Aug. 17 to return to his city and be close to his people. The Archdiocese of Barcelona released photographs of him visiting victims of the attack at the hospital.

In a message to Cardinal Omella, Pope Francis denounced the "cruel terrorist attack" in Barcelona and said such "blind violence," which sows death and pain, is "a great offense to the Creator."

The papal message, sent by Cardinal Pietro Parolin, Vatican secretary of state, included prayers for the eternal repose of the dead, and for their families.

Pope Francis, it said, also prayed that God "would help us continue working with determination for peace and harmony in the world."

In an interview Aug. 18, Msgr. Perez said Barcelona's cathedral and neighboring churches had been closed after the attack as part of a security lockdown, forcing visitors and pilgrims to remain inside until late evening.

"The terrorists who carried out this action have nothing to do with ordinary people here," Msgr. Perez said, noting that "local Muslims are just as shocked and horrified as everyone else."

Candles, flowers and messages of solidarity were placed in memory of victims at various city locations.

Meanwhile, the Tarraconense bishops' conference, grouping Catholic bishops from Spain's Catalonia region, said members were "completely dismayed" by the "barbarity of the attack and the contempt it implies for human life and its dignity," adding that Barcelona and its inhabitants had always been "committed to the cause of peace and justice."

In an Aug. 18 interview with the Spanish church's COPE news agency, Cardinal Ricardo Blasquez, president of the Madrid-based bishops' conference, said Spaniards would be "especially beaten" after the Barcelona outrage, which had "inflicted a wound on everyone." He urged citizens to remember that Muslims were "the main victims" of Islamic State and not to "criminalize" them for the attack or "identify terrorism with Islam."

"Far from being terrorist violence, the true road to building a future of peace, now and forever, lies in respect for all people," Cardinal Blasquez said.

Following the first attack, Bishop Oscar Cantu of Las Cruces, chairman of the USCCB Committee on International Justice and Peace, said the bishops' conference "unequivocally condemns this morally heinous act and places itself in solidarity with the people of the Archdiocese of Barcelona and Spain at this terrible time of loss and grief."

"Terrorist attacks on innocent civilians can never be justified," he said. "To directly attack innocent men, women and children is utterly reprehensible."

The attack is the latest of several in which trucks and vans had been driven at high speed through pedestrian zones in Europe.

In an Aug. 18 message, Archbishop Georges Pontier of Marseille, president of the bishops' conference in neighboring France, said the Barcelona atrocity was "an insult to the Creator," and would unite Catholics in their determination that "evil will not have the last word." In Nice, France, in July 2016, 86 people were killed and 458 injured in a similar attack with a 19-ton truck.

The Las Ramblas attack was Spain's worst since March 2004, when Islamist militants detonated 10 bombs on commuter trains in Madrid, killing 191 people and injuring more than 1,800.

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Pope offers prayers for victims of terrorist attack in Barcelona

Thu, 08/17/2017 - 5:16pm

IMAGE: CNS photo/Ana Jimenez, La Vanguardia via Reuters

By

VATICAN CITY (CNS) -- Pope Francis offered prayers for the victims of a terrorist attack in Barcelona, Spain, that left at least 12 people dead and injured dozens of others.

"With great concern the Holy Father has learned about what is happening in Barcelona. The pope prays for the victims of this attack and wants to express his closeness to the whole Spanish people, particularly the injured and the families of the victims," said an Aug. 17 statement from Greg Burke, director of the Vatican press office.

A speeding van struck pedestrians in Barcelona's Las Ramblas district. The Islamic State took credit for the attack, saying it was in response to calls for its followers to target countries participating in the coalition trying to drive the extremist group from Syria and Iraq, the Associated Press reported.

Spanish church leaders called for prayers.

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Being legally blind doesn't hinder Catholic priest in serving his flock

Thu, 08/17/2017 - 5:05pm

IMAGE: ED KOSKEY JR.

By Anthony Salamone

EASTON, Pa. (CNS) -- A visitor attending Mass at St. Jane Frances de Chantal Church might not notice anything unusual about the celebrant.

Father Bernard J. Ezaki walks the center aisle of the massive church in Easton. He climbs the steps leading to the altar like any other priest or liturgical minister. He recites prayers with the normal vigor and rhythm of a cleric. People might notice Father Ezaki doesn't use the Sacramentary to read the prayers, or that Father Ezaki holds a micro-cassette in his left hand, and that technology contains all the Mass prayers and readings.

He also distributes holy Communion to the faithful just like any other priest, though he has one rule: Be still. "I need a big landing field," he said. "I tell them, especially at funerals, 'I don't want to put my fingers in your mouth.'"

If you haven't caught on by now, here is what you need to know about Father Ezaki: He is legally blind; he has been that way since birth. "I'm grateful," the 60-year-old priest said during an interview in his office, where decorations include a statuette of Stuart, the short, one-eyed minion from the "Despicable Me" movies. "If I could see well, I'd be in trouble. I might not even be a priest today."

Next year, Father Ezaki will celebrate the 30th anniversary of his ordination as a priest in the Diocese of Allentown, which encompasses five counties in eastern Pennsylvania. Spokesman Matt Kerr, who has served the diocese since 2000, said Father Ezaki is the only blind priest in the diocese as far as he knows.

"It's possible there were others, men who became blind as they aged," Kerr said. "But I can't say one way or the other."

A 1991 article in the Allentown Morning Call newspaper cites another spokesman saying Father Ezaki was the first blind priest to be ordained in the diocese. According to an article by Independent Catholic News, an online news outlet in the United Kingdom, church law before 1983 forbade the ordination of blind candidates and those with other physical impairments.

Father Ezaki's blindness resulted from being given too much oxygen following his premature birth. That led to "retinopathy of prematurity," a blinding eye disorder that can affect premature infants and lead to lifelong vision impairment and blindness.

The lack of vision has never slowed him down. The idea of a religious vocation first entered Father Ezaki's mind as a child. He told his parents, the late Dr. Toshio and Mary Ezaki, he wanted to become a priest because he thought they worked only on Sundays. In high school and college, he says, he began seriously considering the priesthood.

Father Ezaki attended Allentown public schools and earned bachelor's and master's degrees, including a master's in theological studies from Harvard Divinity School in Cambridge, Massachusetts. He studied for the priesthood at St. Charles Borromeo Seminary near Philadelphia. As a student, Father Ezaki used recorded textbooks, He took careful notes and always found people willing to read to him.

Father Ezaki said he learned how to record the prayers and readings from another priest who became blind after being ordained. He said he records the liturgy with a magnifying glass and tape recorder.

"You know when you read a lot, your eyes are always a little ahead of your mouth?" he asked. "My ear is always ahead of my mouth."

A wire from the tape cassette runs under his chasuble, with an earpiece in his left ear enabling him to listen to the words. "If I want to stop it to tell a joke, I just stop it," he said.

Father Ezaki began his first year as an assistant pastor. He then taught theology to sophomores at Bethlehem Catholic High School in Bethlehem, Pennsylvania, until 2013, when then-Allentown Bishop John O. Barres, now bishop of the Diocese of Rockville Centre in New York, asked him how long had been teaching.

"I said 24 years," Father Ezaki recalled. "He said, '24 years!' That's the most emotion I've ever seen out of that guy. I knew right then I was out of there."

He came to St. Jane's in October after serving as an assistant pastor at the Cathedral of St. Catharine of Siena in Allentown. Despite his blindness and other setbacks, Father Ezaki never shows bitterness, according to those who know him.

He is known, however, for sprinkling humor into his homilies, writings or every day conversations, with much of it self-deprecating. He sometimes editorializes, too.

At the end of Mass July 2, Father Ezaki mentioned the pride swelling from St. Jane's parishioners with the news that a native of their parish, Bishop-designate Alfred A. Schlert, was named June 27 by Pope Francis to become the diocese's fifth bishop, succeeding Bishop Barres.

"We priests are very enthusiastic," Father Ezaki said. "The good thing is that he knows us, and we know him and The bad thing is we know him and he knows us." That elicited first laughter, then applause, from the congregation. Father Ezaki proclaimed, "Let's belt this one out," as the organist played "America the Beautiful," the recessional hymn for the Sunday before the Independence Day holiday.

Father Ezaki also works on a blog called Apology Analogy, www.apologyanalogy.com. His writings use visual imageries -- analogies -- in defense of the Catholic faith. He is not afraid to express his Catholicism either in his writings or his preaching.

"They say one of the most common human fears is talking in front of people," he said. "Not me. The bigger the crowds, the better. But I have my phobias about other things."

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Copyright © 2017 Catholic News Service/U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops. www.catholicnews.com. All rights reserved. Republishing or redistributing of CNS content, including by framing or similar means without prior permission, is prohibited. You may link to stories on our public site. This copy is for your personal, non-commercial use only. To request permission for republishing or redistributing of CNS content, please contact permissions at cns@catholicnews.com.

U.S. Catholic parishes, schools happy to be in path of solar eclipse

Thu, 08/17/2017 - 4:30pm

IMAGE: CNS photo/Mario Anzuoni, Reuters

By Carol Zimmermann

WASHINGTON (CNS) -- U.S. Catholic parishes and schools located in the 70-mile-wide path of the total solar eclipse Aug. 21 plan to take part in this rare event with everything from providing parking spaces or viewing sites to offering overnight retreats or all-day events with family activities or scientific lectures.

The total eclipse -- to be viewed only with proper eyewear -- begins Aug. 21 in Oregon at 10:18 a.m. PDT and ends in South Carolina at 2:43 p.m. EDT after going over Idaho, Wyoming, Nebraska, Kansas, Missouri, Illinois, Kentucky, Tennessee, Georgia, North Carolina and South Carolina.

How long viewers will see the moon covering the sun depends on where they will be on its coast-to-coast path. Some may only see it for a few seconds, others for a couple of minutes. Maximum eclipse -- at two minutes and 40 seconds -- takes place in Hopkinsville, Kentucky.

But no matter the length of time extent, this historic event is drawing thousands to places where they can get a better view if just for a few minutes and to also celebrate for the day or even a long weekend.

And while they are in the path of the eclipse, some hope they will stay awhile and visit.

Renee Brueckner, operations director of the National Shrine of the Miraculous Medal in Perryville, Missouri, one of the sites in the path, hopes some of the eclipse-viewing crowd makes its way to the shrine where they will have extra tour guides on hand the weekend of Aug. 19-20. The shrine, which is just finishing a major capital restoration project, is ready for visitors but its offices will be closed from 12-2 p.m. local time Aug. 21 for sky gazing.

In Perryville, the total eclipse time is slated to be 2 minutes and 34 seconds, beginning at 1:18 p.m. CDT.

Crowds already will be across the street during the weekend for solar eclipse festivities including food and games at a picnic area owned by St. Vincent de Paul Parish.

Brueckner said she hopes visitors will come to the shrine and "get some contemplative and quiet time."

It's not the only place to highlight spiritual renewal. La Salle Retreat Center in Wildwood, Missouri, is hosting an overnight retreat the night before the eclipse and is inviting the public to its grounds on the day of the event, which there will begin at 1:15 p.m. CDT and last 2 minutes and 14 seconds. The center will sell bottled water and viewing glasses.

"Guests will be able to walk around our beautiful grounds with meditation areas, including a labyrinth and grottoes," the center's marketing and program coordinator, Michelle Cook, told the St. Louis Review, newspaper of the St. Louis Archdiocese.

Our Lady of Good Counsel Retreat House in Waverly, Nebraska, is offering rooms and transportation for eclipse viewers. The retreat center, operated by the Lincoln Diocese, is not directly in the path of the total eclipse, but will take guests to and from the airport and to a town an hour away for solar viewing at 1:03 CDT. The retreat center also is providing box lunches for viewers and will have Mass and eucharistic adoration in the morning.

COR Expeditions, a Catholic outdoor program in Lander, Wyoming, that got its start at Wyoming Catholic College, also is offering an eclipse package that involves eight days of backpacking in the Wyoming's Wind River Mountain Range Aug. 19-26. The group is providing food, technical gear, instructors and transportation and says on its website that the trek after viewing the eclipse will give hikers the chance to "allow the awesome beauty of the eclipse to sink in."

For those who might want to take in a lecture or just activities, that's covered too.

Robert Mitchell, professor of engineering and physical science at St. Ambrose University in Davenport, Iowa, will conduct a live broadcast from Aurora, Nebraska, where the total eclipse can be viewed. The broadcast will be shown at the Putnam Museum in Davenport and will be livestreamed on YouTube. beginning at 11 a.m. CDT with talks and PowerPoint presentations and then a presentation on the eclipse as it happens.

Mitchell said the sky will start to darken around 11:45 a.m. local time but the maximum part of the eclipse will be visible around 1:15 p.m. when it will be dark like night in Aurora, which he noted will confuse birds and other animals.

In an interview with The Catholic Messenger, newspaper of the Davenport Davenport, the professor echoed the often-said warning of not looking directly at the sun during the eclipse.

"Wear proper viewing glasses, get a filter for a telescope, make a pinhole viewer, make a mirror in an envelope or make your own cardboard projector," he said.

Another Catholic college professor equally excited about the eclipse is Ryan Maderak, assistant professor of physics and astronomy at Benedictine College in Atchison, Kansas, which is directly in the path of the total eclipse.

"This is literally the event of the century, and it is falling right in our laps," he said. The college will experience about 2 minutes and 18 seconds of total darkness starting at 1:07 p.m. CDT.

The college has a sold-out event the day of the eclipse with seating in its football stadium for viewing and free solar glasses to the first 7,500 at the gate. The day before the eclipse two astronomers from the Vatican Observatory will give presentations.

The big day will include morning and evening Masses, meals at the school's dining hall, activities at the stadium such as face painting, Frisbee games and water balloon tosses and will end with a "celestial concert." During the day, the school, which just opened a new observatory, will have its telescopes rigged for viewing the sun.

The eclipse will also be a big moment for Catholic schools that are in session.

"It really is like heaven" for a science teacher, said Meg Darke, a parent volunteer in the science lab at Christ the King School in Nashville, which is in the total eclipse path. "We're going to see something that day that man can't re-create. We cannot duplicate with all our technology what we're going to witness. "

Julie Petcu, science enrichment coordinator at St. Matthew School in Franklin, Tennessee, hosted a workshop this summer for area teachers, led by an educator from NASA.

St. Matthew's is just outside the total eclipse band but Christ the King School is right in it and on Aug. 21 the school will host a "solar-bration" event for the school community and parents.

"The entire community will be involved in doing activities that are eclipse related," Darke said. All the students and faculty will gather on the field beside the school to watch the eclipse and their parents will be invited to join.

Immaculate Conception School in Clarksville, Tennessee, also lies in a prime viewing location, just south of the center line of the path of the total eclipse, which will pass through Hopkinsville, which is on the other side of the Tennessee-Kentucky state line.

The total eclipse is expected to be visible in Clarksville for 2 minutes and 21 seconds. Immaculate Conception Principal Stephanie Stafford said that from the first day of school to the eclipse, they would be talking about this event.

And even through many local schools will be closed that day, Immaculate Conception will stay open, she told the Tennessee Register, Nashville's diocesan newspaper.

"We're leaving it up to the parents," she said, "to see if they are willing to fight the traffic."     

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Contributing to this report was Andy Telli in Nashville, Anne Marie Amacher in Davenport and Jennifer Brinker in St. Louis.

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Follow Zimmermann on Twitter: @carolmaczim.

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Copyright © 2017 Catholic News Service/U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops. www.catholicnews.com. All rights reserved. Republishing or redistributing of CNS content, including by framing or similar means without prior permission, is prohibited. You may link to stories on our public site. This copy is for your personal, non-commercial use only. To request permission for republishing or redistributing of CNS content, please contact permissions at cns@catholicnews.com.

Kosovo to dedicate cathedral named for Mother Teresa

Thu, 08/17/2017 - 11:10am

By Jonathan Luxmoore

WARSAW, Poland (CNS) -- A cathedral named for St. Teresa of Kolkata is scheduled to be dedicated in Kosovo on the 20th anniversary of her death.

The cathedral will be dedicated Sept. 5 in Pristina. Albanian-born Cardinal Ernest Simoni will represent Pope Francis at the dedication. Celebrations of the neo-classical cathedral, on Pristina's Bill Clinton Boulevard, will begin Aug. 26, the saint's birthday.

"This will be a great event for our church and all people, whatever their faith and background," said Msgr. Shan Zefi, chancellor of Kosovo's Prizren-based Catholic apostolic administration.

"Mother Teresa was a unifying figure, who worked among Christians and Muslims and was admired by everyone. A cathedral in her honor is a great gift for this country."

He told Catholic News Service Aug. 16 that Catholics were grateful to Kosovo's government for backing the cathedral; its foundation stone was laid in 2005 by the late President Ibrahim Rugova, a Muslim.

"Bishops will come from throughout the region, as well as Muslim and Orthodox leaders, in a sign of majority approval," Msgr. Zefi said.

"St. Teresa's sisters have worked for many years here and enjoyed strong support, especially at a time of unemployment and hardship."

Mostly ethnic Albanian Muslims make up at least 90 percent of the 2.1 million inhabitants of Kosovo, whose 2008 independence from Serbia has been recognized by 111 of the United Nations' 193 member-states, but not by the Vatican.

The Catholic apostolic administration, founded in 2000 with 24 parishes, officially accounts for 3.5 percent of the population, although church leaders put numbers higher.

The cathedral was daubed in Islamist graffiti at its September 2010 opening. However, in his interview, Msgr. Zefi insisted opposition had come "only from a few individuals."

"Our church's ties with Kosovo's Islamic community are developing toward ever greater dialogue and tolerance," he said.

Once fully completed, the building will have two 230-foot bell towers, making it one of the city's largest, as well as a stained-glass window depicting St. Teresa with St. John Paul II, and will become the seat of a full Catholic diocese, relocated from Prizren.

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Copyright © 2017 Catholic News Service/U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops. www.catholicnews.com. All rights reserved. Republishing or redistributing of CNS content, including by framing or similar means without prior permission, is prohibited. You may link to stories on our public site. This copy is for your personal, non-commercial use only. To request permission for republishing or redistributing of CNS content, please contact permissions at cns@catholicnews.com.

Congregation centennial: Supporting Eastern Catholics against all odds

Thu, 08/17/2017 - 10:20am

IMAGE: CNS photo/Laura Ieraci

By Cindy Wooden

VATICAN CITY (CNS) -- The Vatican is celebrating the 100th anniversary of the establishment of the Congregation for Eastern Churches, an office that supports the Eastern Catholic churches and strives to ensure that the universal Catholic Church treasures its diversity, including in liturgy, spirituality and even canon law.

Coincidentally established five months before the Russian Revolution, the congregation continually has had to face the real persecution and threatened existence of some of the Eastern churches it was founded to fortify.

Until 1989-90, many of the Byzantine Catholic churches -- including, notably, the Ukrainian Catholic Church, the largest of all the Eastern churches -- were either outlawed or severely repressed by the communist governments of Eastern Europe, said Archbishop Cyril Vasil, a member of the Slovak Catholic Church and secretary of the congregation.

No sooner had the Soviet bloc disintegrated and once-persecuted churches begun to flourish, then the first Gulf War broke out. And then there was the invasion of Iraq. And the turmoil of the Arab Spring across North Africa. Then the war in Syria. And Israeli-Palestinian tensions continue. The Chaldean, Syriac Catholic, Coptic Catholic, Melkite and Maronite churches have paid a high price.

"In all of this, the Eastern churches suffer the most because they find themselves crushed in the struggle between bigger powers, both local and global," Archbishop Vasil said in mid-August. Even those conflicts that are not taking direct aim at Christians in the Middle East make life extremely difficult for them, and so many decide to seek a more peaceful life for themselves and their families outside the region.

One impact of the "exodus," he said, is the greater globalization of the Catholic Church. While 100 years ago, when the Congregation for Eastern Churches was established, only a few Eastern churches had eparchies -- dioceses -- outside their traditional homelands, today they can be found in Australia, North and South America and scattered across Western Europe.

"In Sweden today, a third of the Christians are Chaldeans or Armenians," he added. "In Belgium and Holland, where Catholicism has suffered a decline, communities are reborn with the arrival of new Christians, which is a reminder of the importance of immigrants bringing their faith with them."

In countries like Italy, where thousands of Ukrainians and Romanians have come to work, they add ritual diversity to the expressions of Catholicism already found there, he said.

The growing movement of people around the globe means that part of the congregation's job is to work with the Latin-rite bishops and dioceses, "sensitizing church public opinion" to the existence, heritage, needs and gifts of the Eastern Catholics moving into their communities, the archbishop said. Where an Eastern Catholic hierarchy has not been established, the local Latin-rite bishop has a responsibility "to accept, welcome and give respectful support to the Eastern Catholics" as their communities grow and become more stable.

The idea, Archbishop Vasil said, is to help the local Latin-rite bishop seriously ask himself, "How can I help them free themselves of me and get their own bishop?"

Although it has only 26 employees -- counting the prefect, Cardinal Leonardo Sandri, and the receptionist -- the Congregation for Eastern Churches works with 23 Eastern Catholic churches and communities, fulfilling the same tasks that for Latin-rite Catholics fall to the congregations for bishops, clergy, religious, divine worship and education. It supports the Pontifical Oriental Institute, which offers advanced degrees in Eastern Christian liturgy, spirituality and canon law. And it also coordinates the work of a funding network known by the Italian acronym ROACO; the U.S.-based Catholic Near East Welfare Association and Pontifical Mission for Palestine are part of that network.

The congregation's approach in some areas is different than its Latin-rite counterparts because it follows the Eastern Catholic traditions and the Code of Canons of the Eastern Churches. For instance, some of the Eastern churches ordain married men to the priesthood.

And, like the Congregation for Bishops, the Congregation for Eastern Churches helps prepare the nomination of bishops by Pope Francis, but only for dioceses outside the Eastern churches' traditional homeland. The Eastern Catholic synods of bishops elect new bishops closer to home and submit their names to the pope for his assent.

But the congregation's primary concern is the survival of the Eastern Catholic churches, which is an issue not only in places where Eastern Catholics are threatened with death or driven from their homelands by war.

Archbishop Vasil said others risk losing their Eastern Catholic identity through assimilation.

Some of the blame, at least before the Second Vatican Council, lies with the Vatican and the Latin-rite hierarchy and religious orders, who, for decades encouraged Eastern Catholics to be more like their Latin-rite brothers and sisters.

Vatican II urged a recovery of the Eastern Catholic traditions, liturgy and spirituality. But, especially for Eastern Catholics living far from their churches' homelands, uprooting vestiges of the "Latinization" can prove difficult, Archbishop Vasil said.

Using his own Slovak Catholic Church as an example, he said parishes have been asked beginning Sept. 1 to return to the Eastern Catholic tradition of administering baptism, chrismation (confirmation) and the Eucharist together at the same liturgy, even for infants. In Slovakia, as in some parishes in North America, Eastern Catholics adopted the Latin-rite church's practicing of withholding the Eucharist until a child is about 7 and then celebrating the child's first Communion.

Especially for Eastern Christians whose ancestors immigrated two or three or four generations ago, the archbishop said, maintaining their specific identity as Chaldean, Ruthenian or Syro-Malankara Catholics is a challenge.

"The greatest danger in the coming years is extinction," Archbishop Vasil said. "We don't know what history has in store for us, but we must make sure we have done everything possible to avoid this danger."

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Follow Wooden on Twitter: @Cindy_Wooden.

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Ohio community cafe responds to hunger while building a following

Wed, 08/16/2017 - 12:07pm

IMAGE: CNS photo/Dennis Sadowski

By Dennis Sadowski

PORT CLINTON, Ohio (CNS) -- Bow tie pasta with Chardonnay cheese sauce, fresh focaccia topped with herbs, a salad of fresh locally grown greens and made-from-scratch bread pudding aren't the usual fare for people in need of a free meal.

At Bistro 163 in this lakefront town 38 miles east of Toledo, such tasty delights are the norm though.

Part of the growing community cafe movement, the nonprofit restaurant with a modern, clean decor in the heart of Ohio's Lake Erie vacationland seeks to connect good food with good fellowship while beginning to address the needs of hungry, lonely and elderly people.

Mary Leucht, 52, of nearby Oak Harbor, has been coming for the meal since winter. The housekeeper at a local hotel said the free meal helps to make ends meet on her modest income.

"I come down for the food and the friendship," she said.

For buddies Robbie Floriana, 53, and Ken Ahrens, 56, both of Port Clinton and unemployed, the meal stretches their limited finances. They also like meeting new people because they never know who they might sit next to at the long community table set up in the in the center of the restaurant.

"We like the atmosphere," Ahrens said between forkfuls of creamy pasta.

They're not alone. Dozens of people have been coming for the meal for months. Visitors have included business executives, city council members and single moms with children.

"It's a lot more than food here we offer," said Stacy Maple, a member of St. Joseph Parish in nearby Marblehead, the restaurant's executive chef and general manager. She also is a graduate of the acclaimed Le Cordon Bleu College of Culinary Arts.

Maple called landing at Bistro 163 a sign from God soon after she and her family -- a husband and two sons -- returned to Ohio after five years in Atlanta. She said she uses her culinary skills while responding to the Gospel call to respect human dignity.

"Everything we do here we want to be a reflection of the needs of our community," Maple said.

"Hunger, I'm learning quickly, is a symptom of so many bigger problems. Food might get them in here and food starts the conversation. But food is not the answer to the problem. You start to realize there are other things affecting peoples' lives," she explained to Catholic News Service.

Bistro 163 opened in June 2016 and is named for the state route that passes nearby. Jack Resetar, 79, a member of Immaculate Conception Parish in Port Clinton who helped establish the endeavor, likes to think its name refers to Proverbs 16:3: "Entrust your works to the Lord, and your plans will succeed."

It is one of about 50 such nonprofits that have emerged since what is believed to be the first opened in 2003 in Salt Lake City by Canton, Ohio, native Denise Cerreta. She is the founder of One World Everybody Eats, a network of community restaurants, and works with local groups exploring the concept.

While some community restaurants have come and gone, others have experienced success during years of operation. One philosophy governing them calls for patrons to pay what they think is a fair price for their meal.

Other restaurants, such as Bistro 163, list a suggested price on the menu and encourage patrons to pay a little more to help cover the cost of a meal for someone who cannot pay. Bistro 163 calls its idea "pay it forward."

"There is not one way or right way to do this," Cerreta told CNS. "It's important to free up the food and to eat in community. Building community is so important."

At Bistro 163, which is open Monday through Saturday for lunch, suggested prices for meals are $7 to $8. The menu changes quarterly, offering seasonal dishes to hold to the concept of locally sourcing food.

How local? The Rev. Bob Butcher, a retired Presbyterian minister, showed up during a recent lunch with a bag full of plump cucumbers from his garden. It was his congregation at Firelands Presbyterian Church that broached the idea of a community cafe with other Port Clinton faith leaders in 2015.

The concept has been well received thus far. Since opening in the location of a twice-failed coffee shop, Bistro 163 has served 20,000 meals, 30 percent of which have been for people who could not pay, Maple said. Those who are unable to pay are asked to volunteer for one hour in exchange, and most people have, she said.

In large part, the restaurants have a small number of paid staff and count on a team of regular volunteers to make the concept work. Bistro 163 draws from a team of about 70 volunteers, largely members of local churches, to staff its lunch service.

Maple also leads a staff of 10 people, including a sous chef, two cooks, three cashiers and four dishwashers. She has hired people who recently were released from prison or are recovering from an addiction as well as high school graduates looking to gain skills before enrolling in a culinary arts program.

Ryan Ross, 31, has worked as sous chef since February after being laid off from his job as a cook at the local Moose lodge. And, he said, he is recovering from an addiction. Ross enjoys making the different meals that emerge from Maple's creativity.

"I absolutely love it here," he said. "It has been great to be able to learn from Stacy. She's a great teacher. She's willing to teach you if you're willing to learn."

Keeping the focus on people in need is a key part of the mission of the restaurant, said Resetar, who serves as the greeter at the monthly meal. He would like to see broader outreach to the community though and he suggested that may be possible as the restaurant becomes more widely known.

"I sense a lot of needs are not being met in the community," he told CNS Aug. 14, before guests began arriving for the meal. "How do you build community, bringing the haves and the have-nots?"

Maple agrees. The restaurant was to resume a weekly After School Snack and Study program for kids as school reopened this fall. Maple is thinking about starting a Saturday morning gathering for teenagers to give them a place to talk and feel safe.

"There are a lot of social concerns here," she said. "I've learned a whole lot in a year's time, that's for sure."

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Follow Sadowski on Twitter: @Dennis Sadowski.

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Copyright © 2017 Catholic News Service/U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops. www.catholicnews.com. All rights reserved. Republishing or redistributing of CNS content, including by framing or similar means without prior permission, is prohibited. You may link to stories on our public site. This copy is for your personal, non-commercial use only. To request permission for republishing or redistributing of CNS content, please contact permissions at cns@catholicnews.com.

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