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January 2012

JENSEN-Frances M.

JENSEN-Frances M., 90. Visitation noon, funeral service 1 p.m., both Jan. 21 at the funeral home. Interment Calvary Cemetery. Preceded in death by daughters, Nancy Wyerman and Sandra Bevins. Survived by husband, John Jensen; sons, Dennis Shannon Jr., Edward Shannon, Patrick Shannon and Gary Foster; daughters, Sharron Snider and Colleen Keleher; grandchildren; great-grandchildren; great-great-grandchildren; friends.

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ELSTON-Constance L.

ELSTON-Constance L., 84. Visitation 2 p.m., vigil service 4 p.m., both Jan. 22 at the funeral home. Memorial Mass 10 a.m., Jan. 23 at Christ the King Church. Preceded in death by husband, Harry R. Elston, Ph.D. Survived by daughters, Christine Garrett and Marchelle Elston; four grandchildren; great-grandchild.

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Faith is the foundation of Catholic schools

The Catholic faith.

It's the guiding principle for Catholic schools and what sets them apart from all other schools across the country, according to administrators, teachers and students who walk the halls and sit in the classrooms.

Faith is reflected in religion classes and weekday Masses, in prayers said throughout the day, in the way children treat one another, approach subjects from math and science to literature and music, and in the way they serve their communities. Catholic schools also provide a supportive environment for students of other faiths.

Faith is the foundation of Catholic schools

The Catholic faith.

It's the guiding principle for Catholic schools and what sets them apart from all other schools across the country, according to administrators, teachers and students who walk the halls and sit in the classrooms.

Faith is reflected in religion classes and weekday Masses, in prayers said throughout the day, in the way children treat one another, approach subjects from math and science to literature and music, and in the way they serve their communities. Catholic schools also provide a supportive environment for students of other faiths.

Placement exams assess students' abilities, needs

Every January, several hundred eighth-graders in Omaha begin their Catholic high school journey with an experience many of their rural northeast Nebraska counterparts do not share: the placement test.

The tests help sort out abilities and needs of students who enter the high schools from a wide variety of parochial, public or out-of-state educational experiences, said the principals of two of the Omaha area's nine Catholic high schools.

Development group shares best practices

Experience and advice found in a regional group of development directors who serve Catholic schools and parishes were a God-send to Deb and Kyle Warren.

With little experience in the field, they took the development helm seven years ago at Pope John XXIII Catholic High School in Elgin. Very quickly they turned to the Nebraska Regional Development Directors, a grassroots group of about 32 representatives from 18 Catholic parishes and schools of varying sizes in Nebraska and Kansas.

Pro-life essay contest opens

Students from the seventh grade through junior year in high school are invited to write about two topics in this year's archdiocesan pro-life essay contest.

They are being asked to imagine a friend or family member suffering from a terminal illness and wanting help to commit suicide.

The students must write convincingly about the immortality of assisted suicide and euthanasia and the redemptive value of suffering in light of Christ's suffering, death and resurrection.

'Souper Bowl' fights hunger

Archdiocesan youth can help in the fight against hunger on Super Bowl weekend Feb. 3-5 by collecting money and food as part of the "Souper Bowl of Caring."

The national effort has raised more than $81 million since it began in 1990.

Youth at participating parishes collect donations, often after Masses, and each parish decides how to use the money, said Rita Ramos, archdiocesan coordinator of youth ministry.

Institute receives $80,000 from Knights

The Institute for Priestly Formation's (IPF) summer program for diocesan seminarians received a financial boost recently from the Knights of Columbus.

The Institute received $75,000 from the Supreme Council of the Knights of Columbus and $5,000 from the Knights' Nebraska State Council.

The gifts will help form seminarians to better serve parishes around the country, said Father Richard Gabuzda, executive director of IPF, which was founded in 1994 in Omaha to assist bishops in the spiritual formation of seminarians and priests.

Catholic Women walk for life

The presence of the Omaha Archdiocesan Council for Catholic Women (OACCW) was more evident this year at the Walk for Life in Lincoln Jan. 28.

The organization gathered as a group for the first time, meeting after the 9 a.m. pro-life Mass at St. Mary Church in downtown Lincoln. They carried a Nebraska Council of Catholic Women sign and wore blue council scarves.

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